condensed discuss document expanded export feedback print share remove reset document_white enquire_white export_white report_white
discuss document export feedback print share gallery-landscape

Letter from E. Waslow Davies to [her Grandmother] Mrs Amey Daldy, October 16, 1904

Library / Pictorial › manuscripts and archives
  • Description
    Regarding Mrs Davies attendance at the Conference of the National Council of Women for New South Wales. She writes of Mrs Fanshaw, wife of the Admiral, who hosted the proceedings and of Vida Goldstein, who she recognised as the best speaker at the event. Mrs Davies goes on to write of Vida Goldstein's 'spirited argument with [Miss?] Duncan, the New South Wales Inspector of Factories, over issues around women receiving equal pay for equal work and factory women taking work out of men's hands. The question of why girls were not going into domestic service was also raised, and reasons such as lack of status, freedom, and amusement had all been proposed. A copy of the Herald containing the account of the proceedings had been forwarded to Mrs Daldy by 'Irene'.
    Mrs Davies also comments on the nature of the audience in attendance. Extract from the text reads: 'of course there were the usual cultured women who support most of our more liberal movements, a few on curiosity went like myself, a few fearful new women, two schoolgirls, a number of teachers come to hear Miss Hodge on German Education, three men (one for the press) in all I suppose 200.'
    Finally, she shares details of her school, which she describes as a 'howling wilderness' under fierce construction due to the damage from the steady rains.
    Addressed: [From: Woodstock, West Street, North Sydney To: Hepburn Street, Auckland]
  • Other Number
    MS-94-4
  • Collection area
  • Record richness
Uncaptioned
Uncaptioned

Catalogue

  • Catalogue title
    Letter from E. Waslow Davies to [her Grandmother] Mrs Amey Daldy, October 16, 1904
  • Identifiers
    MS-94-4  (Reference Number)
  • Creator
  • Language
    English
  • Unit
    Folder 3
  • Description
    Regarding Mrs Davies attendance at the Conference of the National Council of Women for New South Wales. She writes of Mrs Fanshaw, wife of the Admiral, who hosted the proceedings and of Vida Goldstein, who she recognised as the best speaker at the event. Mrs Davies goes on to write of Vida Goldstein's 'spirited argument with [Miss?] Duncan, the New South Wales Inspector of Factories, over issues around women receiving equal pay for equal work and factory women taking work out of men's hands. The question of why girls were not going into domestic service was also raised, and reasons such as lack of status, freedom, and amusement had all been proposed. A copy of the Herald containing the account of the proceedings had been forwarded to Mrs Daldy by 'Irene'. Mrs Davies also comments on the nature of the audience in attendance. Extract from the text reads: 'of course there were the usual cultured women who support most of our more liberal movements, a few on curiosity went like myself, a few fearful new women, two schoolgirls, a number of teachers come to hear Miss Hodge on German Education, three men (one for the press) in all I suppose 200.' Finally, she shares details of her school, which she describes as a 'howling wilderness' under fierce construction due to the damage from the steady rains. Addressed: [From: Woodstock, West Street, North Sydney To: Hepburn Street, Auckland]
  • Collection
  • Part of
  • Physical description
    • 1 folder
    • 8pp on 2 leaves ; 177mm x 226mm Folded to 177mm x 114mm.
  • Production
  • Medium
    Holograph
  • Subject
  • Citation
    Daldy, Amey. Letters, 1902 - 1905. Auckland War Memorial Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira. MS-94-4.

Object tags

Auckland Museum tags

Visitor tags

Contribute
  • Contribute more detail to this record by adding your own names, classifications or categories via a tag. Tags also make this record more findable on search.

Related items

Other items

    The development of the Auckland War Memorial Museum online collection is an ongoing process; updates, new images and records are added weekly. In some cases, records have yet to be confirmed by Museum staff, and there could be mistakes or omissions in the information provided.