condensed discuss document expanded export feedback print share remove reset document_white enquire_white export_white report_white

Explore topics

Artist: Numangatini Fraser Mackenzie

As part of the Pacific Collection Access Project, Auckland Museum and artist Numangatini Fraser Mackenzie co-curated a display. The display text was in both English and the Cook Islands language. The text was translated by Reverend William Hakaoro.

Noqu vosa, me'u bula taka – My language, learn it, speak it, live it

Macawa Ni Vosa Vakaviti (Fiji language week) is held this year from 3–9 October 2016. In celebration, Auckland Museum library is displaying a selection of Fijian publications and photographs from our collections.

Enriching Aotearoa with the Tongan Spirit

With more Tongan people currently born in New Zealand than in Tonga, Aotearoa has a special role in celebrating Tongan language and culture.

E Kete: Baskets from the Cook Islands

In celebration of Cook Islands language week (31 July – 6 August 2016) we have installed three kete or baskets from the southern Cook Islands in our Te Kākano display case.

The art of Samoa​n tātatau and tatau​ (tattooing and tattoo)

The tradition of tātatau and tatau is truly embedded in Samoan custom. One of the most sacred rites of passage for any Samoan is to receive a malofie or pe‘a for men and a malu for women.

Paper mulberry: Prized across the Pacific

Paper, clothing, medicine, rope, furniture and food - all have been made from the paper mulberry tree, a Southeast Asian native tree that can now be found across the Pacific.

Tapa of the Pacific

Tapa or barkcloth made from the inner bark of certain trees is one of the most distinctive products of the cultures of the Pacific islands.

The Coral Route

New Zealand's first package holiday in the Pacific was a glamorous island hop known as the Coral Route. In 1951, Tasman Empire Airways Ltd launched a flying boat service from Auckland to Papeete in Tahiti.

Tairua trolling lure

Auckland Museum has in the collection a unique tangible link between Māori and the East Polynesian homeland. A fishing lure made from tropical black-lipped pearl shell was made in East Polynesia and brought here, on a waka, with the Polynesian settlers of Aotearoa.