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mask

Object / Artefact › Pacific/Ethnology
  • Other titles
    Eharo (Papua New Guinean)
  • Description
    ceremonial mask made of bark cloth on a framework of cane painted with lime charcoal and red ochre surrounded by skirts of dyed sago leaf. Used in dances in connection with the 'Hevehe' ceremony {visit of the spirits of the sea}. This mask is a 'Eharo' mask used to represent totemic objects and unlike the 'Hevehe' mask, is not as sacred and is not ceremonially destroyed.
  • Place
  • Other Number
    1937.108, 23189.2
  • Accession number
    1937.108
  • Collection area
  • Item count
    1
  • Record richness
Uncaptioned
Uncaptioned

Artefact

  • Credit
    Collection of Auckland Museum Tāmaki Paenga Hira, 23189.2
  • Notes
    'Eharo mask, Elema people, Orokolo Bay, Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea. This mask along with 23189.1 were collected by F.E. Williams, the Papuan Government's official anthropologist, who made the most intensive study of the Hevehe ceremonies just before their final disappearance.' Neich and Pendergrast, 'Pacific Tapa', 1997.
  • Culture
  • Production
  • Consists of
  • Dimensions
    • 0 - Whole height : 1990mm
    • 0 - Whole width : 870mm
  • Record created
    4 June 2002

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