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Letter from Miss Christina Henderson to Mrs Amey Daldy, April 14, 1903

Library / Pictorial › manuscripts and archives
  • Description
    Regarding the prospect of Mrs Daldy traveling to New Plymouth for the National Council of Women meeting. The primary reason for Miss Henderson writing however, was to consult Mrs Daldy about the Councils proposed Disabilities Bill. She wrote that Mr McNab, the representative who would present the Bill, would not do so without it being made more specific in scope. Mr McNab suggested selecting the most urgent and pressing disabilities and advocating for them.
    Addressed: [Andover Street, Christchurch]
  • Other Number
    MS-94-7
  • Collection area
  • Record richness
Uncaptioned
Uncaptioned

Catalogue

  • Catalogue title
    Letter from Miss Christina Henderson to Mrs Amey Daldy, April 14, 1903
  • Identifiers
    MS-94-7  (Reference Number)
  • Creator
  • Language
    English
  • Unit
    Folder 5
  • Description
    Regarding the prospect of Mrs Daldy traveling to New Plymouth for the National Council of Women meeting. The primary reason for Miss Henderson writing however, was to consult Mrs Daldy about the Councils proposed Disabilities Bill. She wrote that Mr McNab, the representative who would present the Bill, would not do so without it being made more specific in scope. Mr McNab suggested selecting the most urgent and pressing disabilities and advocating for them. Addressed: [Andover Street, Christchurch]
  • Collection
  • Part of
  • Physical description
    • 1 folder
    • 3pp on 3 leaves ; 262mm x 202mm.
  • Production
  • Medium
    Holograph
  • Subject
  • Keywords
  • Citation
    Daldy, Amey. Letters, 1902 - 1905. Auckland War Memorial Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira. MS-94-7.
  • Notes
    Christina Kirk Henderson was born in Melbourne, Australia in 1861, and settled with her family in Christchurch around 1882. She worked as a schoolteacher in Ashburton, and at Springston School in Christchurch while studying towards her Bachelors part time. In 1901, Henderson became the first president of the Association of Women Teachers, and was Secretary of National Council of Women from 1902-1905. She fought passionately for the right of women to serve as police, members of Parliament, jurors and justices of the peace; she herself was appointed a justice of the peace on 23 February 1928.

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