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The first Anzac Day

The first Anzac Day didn't include a dawn service or the wearing of poppies; those traditions were yet to begin. Instead people gathered at town halls, schools and churches to remember those who returned from Gallipoli, and those who were left behind.​

The underground war

The New Zealand Tunnelling Company were the first New Zealanders to arrive at the Western Front - in March 1916.

Mrs Alice Mickle: Friend of the soldiers

As the wife of the local doctor, Mrs Alice Mickle knew many of the 'Birkenhead boys' who left for the First World War. She collected their photos and letters in an album, captioning each one with details about the individual’s service.​

Te Hokowhitu a Tū: Badges of Māori contingents in WWI

Soldiers who enlisted in the 'all-fighting Māori unit' served in three different battalions during the First World War. Each unit was represented by a set of badges.

Auckland Roll of Honour

​A Roll of Honour is a list of names of people who served their country during war. Whether marked in stone, newsprint or handwritten, a Roll of Honour is a poignant reminder of the impact of war.

The Auckland Museum frieze: Scenes of war

The frieze wrapping around the exterior of the Auckland War Memorial Museum building skilfully blends ancient with modern to bring the timelessness and grandeur of Ancient Greece together with the story of New Zealanders in WWI and WWII. ​

A living memorial

Almost a third of the 18,166 New Zealanders who died as a result of the First World War have no known graves; buried half a world away from their grieving families. Auckland War Memorial Museum was built by a community that needed a place to remember those who died.

The Battle of Passchendaele

Find out why this major World War One battle took place and how it led to two of New Zealand's greatest tragedies amid dreadful conditions.

New Zealand troops in Sāmoa

After Britain declared war on Germany on 4 August 1914, New Zealand sent an Expeditionary Force Advance Party to capture the German territory of Sāmoa and the state-of-the-art wireless tower recently erected near Apia to capture the German territory on behalf of the British Empire.