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Names on the walls, engraved in stone

Auckland's First World War story is inscribed in stone: the names of significant battles are etched on the Museum's exterior walls, and the dead are remembered by name on the Roll of Honour.

Bomber Command - The Dambusters

The NZ Bomber Command Association Memorial Sculpture commemorates the 2,157 New Zealanders who lost their lives flying with the RAF Bomber Command. Mini Prasad discusses the making of the memorial and the history of the two New Zealanders who flew in the Dambusters raid.

Noqu vosa, me'u bula taka – My language, learn it, speak it, live it

Macawa Ni Vosa Vakaviti (Fiji language week) is held this year from 3–9 October 2016. In celebration, Auckland Museum library is displaying a selection of Fijian publications and photographs from our collections.

September on the Somme

On 15 September 1916 New Zealand soldiers joined the Battle of the Somme, one of the bloodiest battles of the time. Letters and images from those involved tell us of the horrors.

Enriching Aotearoa with the Tongan Spirit

With more Tongan people currently born in New Zealand than in Tonga, Aotearoa has a special role in celebrating Tongan language and culture.

A touch of colour

Have you ever tried colour by numbers? Well, just imagine applying colour to a large photograph with cotton wool!

Barry Brickell

The papers of Barry Brickell demonstrate the artist's all-consuming passion for pottery, steam trains, and conservation.

The Battle of Romani

After Gallipoli, the men and horses of the New Zealand Mounted Rifle Brigade returned to Egypt. As part of the newly formed Anzac Mounted Division, they were back in action at Romani in August 1916.​​

A wedding in the North African desert

​The wartime wedding of Captain Thomas Blake and Connie Deane captured imaginations when it was reported in newspapers in late 1915. The ceremony took place at Zeitoun Camp, near Cairo, in full military style. ​

The Battle of Crete

The sight of thousands of German paratroopers filling the Cretan sky signalled the beginning of one of the most dramatic battles of the Second World War.

The first Anzac Day

The first Anzac Day didn't include a dawn service or the wearing of poppies; those traditions were yet to begin. Instead people gathered at town halls, schools and churches to remember those who returned from Gallipoli, and those who were left behind.​

Weddings and war in 1940s New Zealand

Weddings in New Zealand during the Second World War continued the tradition of long white or ivory coloured dresses, often with trains and flowing veils. This was in contrast to Britain for example where clothing was severely rationed.