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Tale of the giant moa

One of our most remarkable exhibits – a three-metre tall female giant moa reconstruction – has turned 100 years old. Built in 1913, she tells a unique (but ultimately tragic) evolutionary tale and recalls museum displays over the century.

Hauraki Gulf shearwaters: Globe-trotting on underwater wings

​These small seabirds are one of the most amazingly engineered creatures on the face of the planet, capable of movement above and below the seas surface that we can only dream of.​

Sea snakes and kraits in New Zealand

It's a common misconception that New Zealand has no snakes, but it's not the truth. Marine snakes, or sea snakes, are seen regularly in the waters around northern New Zealand.

Bluebottle Physalia physalis

New Zealanders like to pride themselves on living in a country with no harmful animals such as poisonous snakes or grizzly bears. But it is a different story in the ocean.

Spring flowers in Auckland Domain

Find out about a few plants very close to Auckland Museum, and learn about the language botanists use to describe introduced species.

Ancient currency or petrified food?

Sometimes, human history and natural history are neatly entwined, as was recently discovered when researching a pair of disc-shaped fossil specimens.

The Huia

​In a country known globally for its unique bird diversity and the tragic loss of its birdlife following human arrival, no species resonates more in the stories of the formation of our nation than the huia.​

Te Wai (Water)

Water is a defining feature of Auckland. Both wai māori (fresh) and wai tai (salty), it nourishes and refreshes us, and in return requires looking after. Without water, the huarahi (roads) would be even more congested and our tūpuna (ancestors) might never have arrived here.

Antarctic geological connections

Most of the Antarctic rock specimens at Auckland Museum are from Ross Island and McMurdo Sound, and a number were collected during the Scott or Shackleton Expeditions.