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Volume 53 (2018)

Edited by J.W. Early and L. Furey
ISSN 2422-8567

https://doi.org/10.32912/ram.2018.53

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  • The Auckland War Memorial Museum houses nearly 2000 Egyptian artefacts dating from the Palaeolithic to the modern era. Artefacts were obtained from professional institutions and societies including Cairo Museum, the Egypt Exploration Society, and the British Museum in the early 20th century. In addition, a number of objects were obtained from ‘soldier collectors’ during World Wars I and II. The collection is made up of objects from around Egypt, but mainly consists of collections from Amarna, Saqqara, Kharga, Abydos, and Matmar, amongst others. Here the history of the collection is examined.
  • ‘A matter of duty’: the Egyptian collection at the Auckland War Memorial Museum
  • The Auckland War Memorial Museum houses nearly 2000 Egyptian artefacts dating from the Palaeolithic to the modern era. Artefacts were obtained from professional institutions and societies including Cairo Museum, the Egypt Exploration Society, and the British Museum in the early 20th century. In addition, a number of objects were obtained from ‘soldier collectors’ during World Wars I and II. The collection is made up of objects from around Egypt, but mainly consists of collections from Amarna, Saqqara, Kharga, Abydos, and Matmar, amongst others. Here the history of the collection is examined.
  • Last updated on: 11 Nov 2019 | File Size: 2.2 MB

  • The Mackelvie Trust was set up to administer James Tannock Mackelvie’s (1824−85) collection now held at the Auckland Art Gallery, the Auckland War Memorial Museum and the Auckland Public Library. This article will explain how part of the collection came to be at the Auckland War Memorial Museum, how the Trustees administered the will, and how the Trust Board itself evolved to include professional expertise. The impact of this evolution on Mackelvie’s gifts and bequest and the collection’s development is one of the most important findings.
  • Preserving a legacy: an analysis of the role and function of the Mackelvie Trust Board, 1885−2010
  • The Mackelvie Trust was set up to administer James Tannock Mackelvie’s (1824−85) collection now held at the Auckland Art Gallery, the Auckland War Memorial Museum and the Auckland Public Library. This article will explain how part of the collection came to be at the Auckland War Memorial Museum, how the Trustees administered the will, and how the Trust Board itself evolved to include professional expertise. The impact of this evolution on Mackelvie’s gifts and bequest and the collection’s development is one of the most important findings.
  • Last updated on: 11 Nov 2019 | File Size: 1.9 MB

  • The Auckland War Memorial Museum holds a large number of cultural objects, a collection of shells, and a group of butterflies, all collected by the Methodist missionary, Arthur Henry Voyce during his years as a Methodist minister in Bougainville in the period 1926–1958. His relationship with museums in New Zealand, and the background to the acquisitions is described.
  • ‘Your list is certainly a formidable one’: the Rev. A.H. Voyce and the Auckland Museum
  • The Auckland War Memorial Museum holds a large number of cultural objects, a collection of shells, and a group of butterflies, all collected by the Methodist missionary, Arthur Henry Voyce during his years as a Methodist minister in Bougainville in the period 1926–1958. His relationship with museums in New Zealand, and the background to the acquisitions is described.
  • Last updated on: 11 Nov 2019 | File Size: 2.1 MB

  • An annotated species-list is given for Waya Island (Yasawa Is. Group, Fiji). It contains 38 ferns and lycophytes, 1 cycad, 55 monocotyledons, and 224 dicotyledons. Nearly all these 318 species are indigenous to Fiji or are likely to be ancient (pre-European) introductions.
  • The plants of Waya Island, Fiji
  • An annotated species-list is given for Waya Island (Yasawa Is. Group, Fiji). It contains 38 ferns and lycophytes, 1 cycad, 55 monocotyledons, and 224 dicotyledons. Nearly all these 318 species are indigenous to Fiji or are likely to be ancient (pre-European) introductions.
  • Last updated on: 11 Nov 2019 | File Size: 2.8 MB

  • Henry Ward, the American businessman and trader in natural history specimens, visited Auckland Museum in 1881 and subsequently helped the museum to recruit a preparator. Correspondence between Ward and the museum’s curator, Thomas Cheeseman, shows that the first preparator sent by Ward was the Belgian Charles De Kempeneer. He started at Auckland Museum in July 1882 for a trial period of about three months until October 1882.
  • Charles De Kempeneer (c. 1852–1884), preparator: one of Auckland Museum’s earliest employees
  • Henry Ward, the American businessman and trader in natural history specimens, visited Auckland Museum in 1881 and subsequently helped the museum to recruit a preparator. Correspondence between Ward and the museum’s curator, Thomas Cheeseman, shows that the first preparator sent by Ward was the Belgian Charles De Kempeneer. He started at Auckland Museum in July 1882 for a trial period of about three months until October 1882.
  • Last updated on: 11 Nov 2019 | File Size: 1.5 MB

Table of contents

  • "A matter of duty": the Egyptian collection at the Auckland War Memorial Museum

    By Joshua Emmitt (University of Auckland) & Louise Furey
    pp. 1–16

    The Auckland War Memorial Museum houses nearly 2000 Egyptian artefacts dating from the Palaeolithic to the modern era. Artefacts were obtained from professional institutions and societies including Cairo Museum, the Egypt Exploration Society, and the British Museum in the early 20th century. In addition, a number of objects were obtained from ‘soldier collectors’ during World Wars I and II. The collection is made up of objects from around Egypt, but mainly consists of collections from Amarna, Saqqara, Kharga, Abydos, and Matmar, amongst others. Here the history of the collection is examined.

    Read more
  • Preserving a legacy: an analysis of the role and function of the Mackelvie Trust Board, 1885−2010

    By Andrew McKay (Auckland University)
    pp. 17–26

    The Mackelvie Trust was set up to administer James Tannock Mackelvie’s (1824−85) collection now held at the Auckland Art Gallery, the Auckland War Memorial Museum and the Auckland Public Library. This article will explain how part of the collection came to be at the Auckland War Memorial Museum, how the Trustees administered the will, and how the Trust Board itself evolved to include professional expertise. The impact of this evolution on Mackelvie’s gifts and bequest and the collection’s development is one of the most important findings.

    Read more
  • ‘Your list is certainly a formidable one’: the Rev. A.H. Voyce and the Auckland Museum

    By Moira White (Otago Museum)
    pp. 27–42

    The Auckland War Memorial Museum holds a large number of cultural objects, a collection of shells, and a group of butterflies, all collected by the Methodist missionary, Arthur Henry Voyce during his years as a Methodist minister in Bougainville in the period 1926–1958. His relationship with museums in New Zealand, and the background to the acquisitions is described.

    Read more
  • The plants of Waya Island, Fiji

    By Rhys O. Gardner
    pp. 43–76

    An annotated species-list is given for Waya Island (Yasawa Is. Group, Fiji). It contains 38 ferns and lycophytes, 1 cycad, 55 monocotyledons, and 224 dicotyledons. Nearly all these 318 species are indigenous to Fiji or are likely to be ancient (pre-European) introductions. Except for six species, post-European introductions (weeds and cultivated species) have not been included.

    Read more
  • Charles De Kempeneer (c. 1852–1884), preparator: one of Auckland Museum’s earliest employees

    By Brian Gill (Associate Emeritus)
    pp. 77–84

    Henry Ward, the American businessman and trader in natural history specimens, visited Auckland Museum in 1881 and subsequently helped the museum to recruit a preparator. Correspondence between Ward and the museum’s curator, Thomas Cheeseman, shows that the first preparator sent by Ward was the Belgian Charles De Kempeneer. He started at Auckland Museum in July 1882 for a trial period of about three months until October 1882.

    Read more