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The Auckland War Memorial Museum Collection of Stone Tools from Pitcairn Island, Southeast Polynesia  

By Emma Ash and Louise Furey
PP. 1-16

https://doi.org/10.32912/ram.2023.57.1

Chisels and gouges manufactured from fine-grained basalt. A–B, chisels. C–G, gouges, illustrating range of  forms described in the text. Auckland War Memorial Museum 31214.1, 28881.2, 30141.1, 2019.x.58, 28398.1, 28445.1, 28324

Chisels and gouges manufactured from fine-grained basalt. A–B, chisels. C–G, gouges, illustrating range of forms described in the text. Auckland War Memorial Museum 31214.1, 28881.2, 30141.1, 2019.x.58, 28398.1, 28445.1, 28324

© Auckland Museum Cultural Permissions Apply
Abstract

Auckland Museum Tāmaki Paenga Hira holds approximately 20,000 stone tools from Pitcairn Island. Acquired in the 1930s–1950s it is the largest museum-held collection of tools from the island. A wide range of tool types are represented across all manufacturing stages, use and condition. The 
collection remains largely under researched, just as the history of Polynesian occupation on Pitcairn is poorly understood. An initial description of the Auckland Museum’s unique collection is provided within the known archaeology of the island, while also exploring Pitcairn’s position in southeast Polynesia as a source of valuable stone material.

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Citation

Ash, Emma., & Furey, Louise (2023). The Auckland War Memorial Museum Collection of Stone Tools from Pitcairn Island, Southeast Polynesia https://doi.org/10.32912/ram.2023.57.1

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