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John Craddock Armstrong

Identity

  • Title
  • Forenames
    John Craddock AWMM
  • Surname
    Armstrong AWMM
  • Ingoa
  • Also known as
  • Service number
    60686 AWMM
  • Gender
    Male AWMM
  • Iwi
  • Hapū
  • Waka
  • Rohe
  • Religion

Civilian life

About birth

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  • Birth
    19 October 1913 AWMM MastertonWairarapa AWMM
    Masterton, Wairarapa, New Zealand AWMM
  • Date of birth
  • Place of birth
  • Birth notes
  • Address before enlistment
    WW2 Pre 1941 AWMM Maungarau P.B., Masterton AWMM
  • Post war occupation
  • Next of kin on embarkation
    WW2 Mrs. F.R. Armstrong, Private Bag, Rivelin, Masterton (w) AWMM
  • Relationship status

Service

Wars and conflicts

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  • War
  • Campaign
  • Armed force / branch
    Army AWMM
  • Service number
    60686 AWMM
  • Military service
  • Promotions/ Postings/ Transfers

Military decorations

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  • Medals and Awards
    Military Medal (MM) AWMM
    20 July 1944 AWMM
    'On 22 February 1944, opposite CASSINO, Italy, the area was shelled heavily by enemy 150 mm and 170 mm guns. A shell burst in one dug-out killing one gunner and wounding two others. Amidst the shelling, Lance Bombardier Armstrong assisted the two wounded to the shelter of a house. A shell then hit the house, wounding other personnel sheltering there. Having rung for an ambulance, Lance Bombardier proceeded to carry the wounded, now five in number, to cover out of the shelled area. When all the wounded had been moved be went back to the house to look for personnel not accounted for and to clear away the rubble. The area was still being heavily shelled and he had to be ordered away from the position. By his cool and courageous action, Lance Bombardier Armstrong undoubtedly saved the lives of five men. Under fire he displayed courage of a very high order and his cheerfulness and coolness in trying circumstances was an inspiration to everyone in the area.'. (Source: The National Archives. Recommendation for Award for Armstrong, John Craddock. (Ref. WO 373/6/661). Military Medal. AWMM

Training and Enlistment

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  • Military training
  • Enlistment
    WW2 Unknown AWMM Farm hand/Civilian AWMM
  • Occupation before enlistment
  • Age on enlistment

Embarkations

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Prisoner of war

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  • Capture details
  • Days interned
  • Liberation date
  • Liberation Repatriation
  • POW liberation details
  • POW serial number

Medical history

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  • Medical notes

Last known rank

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  • Last rank

Biographical information

Biographical information

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  • Lance Sergeant J. C. Armstrong, MM; Masterton; born Masterton, 19 Oct 1913; farm labourer. (Source: Murphy, W.E. 2nd NZ Divisional Artillery. p.563.)

    'Lance-Bombardier Armstrong at once rushed to the scene of the shelling and helped the wounded from the dugout to the shelter of a house. Another shell then hit the house. Armstrong had telephoned for an ambulance car and he now carried the wounded, by this time five men, out of the area that was being shelled. He went back to the house to look for any others who might have been buried in the rubble and began to clear it away. The shelling continued, and in the end Armstrong had to be ordered away from the position. His persistence in caring for the wounded regardless of his own safety earned him an MM.' (Source: Murphy, W.E. 2nd NZ Divisional Artillery. p. 563.) AWMM
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Death

About death

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  • Death
  • Date of death
  • Age at death
  • Place of death
  • Cause of death
  • Death notes
  • Cemetery
  • Cemetery name
  • Grave reference
  • Obituary
  • Memorial name
  • Memorial reference

Memorials

Memorial

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  • Memorial name

Roll of Honour

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Sources

Sources

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  • External links
    • 'The KING has been graciously pleased to approve the following awards in recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy.' (London Gazette, 20 July 1944, p.3378.). Military Medal.
      http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/36615/supplements/3378
      Further Reference
    • 'On 22 February 1944, opposite CASSINO, Italy, the area was shelled heavily by enemy 150 mm and 170 mm guns. A shell burst in one dug-out killing one gunner and wounding two others. Amidst the shelling, Lance Bombardier Armstrong assisted the two wounded to the shelter of a house. A shell then hit the house, wounding other personnel sheltering there. Having rung for an ambulance, Lance Bombardier proceeded to carry the wounded, now five in number, to cover out of the shelled area. When all the wounded had been moved be went back to the house to look for personnel not accounted for and to clear away the rubble. The area was still being heavily shelled and he had to be ordered away from the position. By his cool and courageous action, Lance Bombardier Armstrong undoubtedly saved the lives of five men. Under fire he displayed courage of a very high order and his cheerfulness and coolness in trying circumstances was an inspiration to everyone in the area.'. (Source: The National Archives. Recommendation for Award for Armstrong, John Craddock. (Ref. WO 373/6/661). Military Medal.
      http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=D7350597
      Further Reference
  • Documents
    • Sutherland, J. (1989). Gallantry awards to New Zealanders in World War Two. Christchurch, N.Z.: Regal Medals. AWMM
    • Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force. (1941). Nominal Roll Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force No. 4 (Embarkations from 1st April, 1941 to 30 June, 1941). Wellington, N.Z.: Govt. Printer. AWMM
      WW2 4: WW2 14 AWMM
    • Murphy, W. (1966). 2nd New Zealand Divisional Artillery. Wellington, N.Z.: Department of Internal Affairs, War History Branch. AWMM
      p.563. AWMM
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