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Edward Haupuru Wells

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Portrait, Edward Wells in uniform. Courtesy of Lily Anne Wynne (Wells) and 28 (Maori) Battalion Reunion Committee 2006. - This image may be subject to copyright
Portrait, Edward Wells in uniform. Courtesy of Lily Anne Wyn … Read more

Identity

  • Title
  • Forenames
    Edward Haupuru AWMM
  • Surname
    Wells AWMM
  • Ingoa
  • Also known as
    Eddie AWMM
  • Service number
    65372 AWMM
  • Gender
    Male AWMM
  • Iwi
  • Hapū
  • Waka
  • Rohe
  • Religion

Civilian life

About birth

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Service

Wars and conflicts

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  • War
  • Campaign
    • North Africa AWMM
    • Libya AWMM
    • Tunisia AWMM
    • Sinai & Palestine AWMM
    • Italy AWMM
  • Armed force / branch
    Army AWMM
  • Service number
    65372 AWMM
  • Military service
  • Promotions/ Postings/ Transfers

Military decorations

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  • Medals and Awards

Training and Enlistment

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Prisoner of war

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  • Capture details
  • Days interned
  • Liberation date
  • Liberation Repatriation
  • POW liberation details
  • POW serial number

Medical history

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  • Medical notes
    • Hospital Diseases , Wounds, WWII AWMM
      Wounded 26 August 1942 AWMM
    • Died of Disease, Cause of Death AWMM
      Carcinoma of lungs AWMM

Last known rank

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Biographical information

Biographical information

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  • Husband of Esther; father of Echo and Lily

    Tangihanga held at Potahi Marae, Te Kao, New Zealand

    Written by Lily Anne Wynne (Wells): 'It is sad to look around now and see the men that you have grown up with are no longer here. But their legacy is still evident in the ties that they forged so many years ago. My father, Eddie Wells and his friends like Len Munn, Ruki Henare and Bill Pitman (to name a few) were comrades in arms and out families were very close. Our ties were, in fact, a lot closer then with many of our whanau. These ties have stood the test of time as later generations have remained just as close.

    The men came from different parts of the North and when they returned after the Second World War, they married, started their families and settled here in Whangarei. They got on with their lives but the thing that sticks in my mind, is that when there was a birth, marriage, coming-of-age or death, they were always there supporting, helping and just being a part of the event. But mostly it was at the reunions that these men strengthened and sustained their ties.

    Sometimes I feel that I was a lot closer to these men and their families then I was with my blood relations as I grew up knowing them as my uncles, their wives were my aunts and their children were my cousins.

    I grew up hearing stories of how each of them met, how they survived the war and how it was when they returned home. Whether some of the stories were embellished didn't matter. It was hearing these men laugh and sometimes seeing them exchange knowing glances like a secret language they shared. They also knew how to argue and fight. One memory sticks out was when my father was in the street and this man yelled out to him. As they got closer then started to trade a few punches and a few choice words. This was how Eddie and Ruke would always greet each other.

    Uncle Len came across as a stern, forthright man, who had a wicked laugh and did not suffer fools readily. I also remember the Uncle Len who baptized my grand-daughter; held her close and kissed her after the services. She was totally enthralled by him. This totally amazed my father, as he had never seen Uncle Len show this side of him.

    When one of their own fell, those left behind felt the loss more than ever. As the years progressed, their numbers diminished and the memories became clouded. Their legacy is that we must try as they did. We will remember them.

    To my fellow men at arms; Those companions of my youth, Sharers of my fears, hopes, dreams and sorrows in those years of a world in anguish. My privilege it was to be with you. Men of the Maori Battalion Ake Ake Kia Kaha E by Major James Aperahama' End letter by Lily Anne Wynne (Wells) of Whangarei.

    A daughter notes her father enlisted for "JForce" and attested 22 February 1946. At his mother's request he changed his m ind and did not go to Japan

    His headstone records: Beloved husband of Esther has the emblem of the 28th Battalion and also a photograph AWMM
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Death

About death

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  • Death
    13 March 2004 AWMM
    Age 84 AWMM
    WhangareiNorthland AWMM
  • Date of death
  • Age at death
  • Place of death
  • Cause of death
  • Death notes
  • Cemetery
    urupa, near Potahi Marae, Te Kao, Northland, New Zealand AWMM
  • Cemetery name
  • Grave reference
  • Obituary
    Death notice: New Zealand Herald, 16 March 2004 AWMM
  • Memorial name
  • Memorial reference

Memorials

Memorial

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  • Memorial name

Roll of Honour

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Sources

Sources

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  • External links
  • Documents
    • Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force. (1942). Nominal Roll Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force No. 5 (Embarkations from 1st July, 1941 to 30 September, 1941). Wellington, N.Z.: Govt. Printer. AWMM
      WW2 5: WW2 223 AWMM
    • The New Zealand Herald AWMM
      Death notice: New Zealand Herald, 16 March 2004 AWMM