When you’re in need of an at-home Museum fix, experience some of the best parts of Tāmaki Paenga Hira here. Watch how volcanoes are made, write a poem for Auckland, make native birds come alive in a puzzle, deep dive into one of our blogs or discover some fun and educational activities to entertain the kids. Spend some time with us online today. Our collections are here for you to explore.

 

We regularly update this page with new videos, blog posts and children's activities, so keep coming back to see what’s new.

Light trapping at home
MOTH WEEK

School holidays science

Light trapping at home

Catching moths is a very easy and fun thing to do. I got the idea from a work trip my mum [Auckland Museum Collection Manager (Land Fauna) Ruby Moore] took me to, they had a big sheet and a torch and you could get a container to get anything you wanted. It was like a supermarket full of wonderful moths.

At home it is easy to set up your own light trap. All you need is a clear outside space (decks are perfect for it), a strong torch, a white sheet, and the ability to stay up late. I set up my own moth trapping during lockdown, and when I first laid out the sheet and turned the light on it was only a few minutes before a moth landed on the sheet. We saw Scopula rubraria, and Capua intractana moths as well as lots of other night-time insects. Luckily my mum had lots of containers to put them in for taking photos.

Moths in the city must be very confused because of the artificial lights which they think are moons: “How many moons are there in this city?”

By Bernice Moore, Citizen Scientist

Celebrate Pacific Language Weeks
FROM THE COLLECTION

Celebrate Pacific Language Weeks

We're working closely with Aotearoa's Pasifika communities to promote culture through language. In these pages, you can explore collection objects, read interviews, look at artworks, watch videos, and learn some words, too. 

Learn more

Remembering Moruroa
PACIFIC HISTORY

The Deep Secret

Remembering Moruroa

On 2 July 1966, France began the first of 193 nuclear tests at Moruroa atoll in French Polynesia, with catastrophic effect. To mark the 55th anniversary of the first test, we've brought together some perspectives from different areas of the Museum to commemorate that day.

Learn more

Form and function
FROM THE COLLECTION

Eid al Fitr

Form and function

Eid al Fitr, or the Festival of Breaking the Fast, is when Muslims around Aotearoa and the world celebrate the end of Ramadan, the month of dawn-to-sunset fasting. The Ramadan festival honours the revealing of the Qu’ran to the prophet Muhammad.

In the Museum’s collections, we hold this leather satchel and unbound Qu’ran, with handwritten calligraphic and illustrated pages in black, red, and yellow. This innovative style of Qu’ran is commonly associated with the Hausa people of Northern Nigeria, designed with accompanying satchel (gafaka in Hausa language) for ease when travelling. The lack of binding means that the elaborately decorated pages can be studied individually, and also shared with others for memorising. Still made today by calligrapher scholars, this Qu’ran is an early 20th Century example of the manuscript culture of North East Nigeria in Muslim Africa. A description of the contemporary making of this type of manuscript is detailed in The Arts and Crafts of Literacy: Islamic Manuscript Cultures in Sub-Saharan Africa (2017).  

This particular Qu’ran was donated to the Museum in 1928 by J R Adams-Wilkes, a New Zealander who worked as a colonial administrator in Nigeria. If you have any information about the history of this type of Qu’ran, we’d love to hear from you.

Commemorating  Anzac at Home
Anzac 2021

Commemorating Anzac at Home

While we can once again come together in person this year, on this page you can have a look back at last year's in-bubble commemorations, read new blogs, and find even more ways to honour our servicepeople.

Read more

A second look into the past
BLOG

Archaeology Week

A second look into the past

As Tāmaki Makaurau prepared for its fourth Covid-19 lockdown, archaeologists from Auckland Museum Tāmaki Paenga Hira were already at work on one of the city's more isolated locations - Ōtata Island. In this blog for TheNoises.nz, Associate Curator (Archaeology) Emma Ash details how the discovery of Māori occupation sealed beneath a layer of volcanic ash from Rangitoto prompted the team's return to the island to investigate this significant discovery further.

Read more

Director's Choice
E-BOOK

Director's Choice

Auckland Museum's Chief Executive, Dr David Gaimster, explores the museum's extraordinary collection, each item with its own compelling backstory, in this volume—part of Scala's international Director's Choice series. New photography showcases some of the key items in the collection in exquisite detail.

READ IT ONLINE

The Enduring Impact of the First World War
RESEARCH

The Bulletin

The Enduring Impact of the First World War

Each edition of the Bulletin of the Auckland Museum showcases a range of original research by our staff and other academics, pieces relating to items in the Museum's collection or, in the case of this edition, a major historical event. Co-edited by Associate Curator (History) Gail Romano with Prof Kingsley Baird (Massey University), this edition explores some of the legacies of 1917 – a remarkable single year during the First World War. 

Read more

For the kids

For the kids

Boredom busters for inquisitive minds! Have a go at our interactive games, download activities to do offline and watch fun and educational videos made just for kids.

ready, set, go!

Piece by piece

Piece by piece

Take a closer look at some of our collection objects by doing one (or several!) of our jigsaw puzzles. You can adjust the difficulty of each puzzles to suit the puzzler, so they suit any age, skill level, or time contraint.

Choose your puzzle

   

The Story of Te Awe


Te Awe was a project about enriching, reorganising, and improving the care of our 10,000+ taonga Māori in a way that is embedded in Mātauranga Māori. Through this mahi Auckland Museum made the taonga Māori collection more visible and accessible to iwi, hāpu, whānau, Museum staff, researchers, and the public. 

Learn more about the project and watch all four episodes here.

Take a virtual tour

Take a virtual tour

We've opened up our exhibition archives for you to explore. Travel through time and space as you virutally walk through our archive of historic exhibitions.

Come on in

Beauty is in the eye of the purse-holder
GOOGLE ARTS & CULTURE

Beauty is in the eye of the purse-holder

The protruding claws may not scream elegance at first, but this purse crafted from the foot of an albatross is part of a long history of pouches and bags fashioned from seabirds. Take a Google Arts & Culture audio tour of this peculiar purse and learn how such a curious object came into being.

Listen Now

Want to read more?

Want to read more?

Whether you're after a fast fact or a deep dive, we've collected stories, blogs and short reads from all around the Museum's collections and gathered them here. 

Read much, much more


16th Century ceramic dish, Turkey. AWMM K1850.