Open daily from 9am - 5pm.
Now open until 8.30PM Tuesdays for Twilight Tuesdays.

 

Whether you're after a quick bite and a coffee on-the-run, a lingering long lunch or a celebratory high tea, Tuitui Museum Bistro & Café is Auckland Museum's new destination for food and drink. With views on one side out to the Domain and on the other up to the tanoa, Tuitui is part of the fabric of Te Ao Mārama, your new South Atrium. Please note that last orders are at 8PM.

 

 

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Enjoy a range of classic cocktails with a twist

About Tuitui


In te Reo Māori, Tuitui means ‘to stitch together’, but it can also refer to the meeting of friends and whanau over good kai and kōrero. The idea of bringing people together was central to Brian and Sali Sewell’s vision when they set out to create the latest in a long line of successful eateries. It’s present in almost every aspect of Tuitui, from sharing woodfired pizza at the long marble bar, to the collaborative staff culture and the woven kete motif that adorns the walls.

Tutui’s menu is a masterful blend of past and present, representing the fulfilment of a dream Brian had ever since he found a 1950’s Women’s Weekly recipe book in a secondhand bookshop in Waipu. Featuring creative interpretations of Kiwi classics like fish and chips, mussels, and roast lamb, Brian’s creative dishes often feature native New Zealand ingredients and seasonal produce, sourced from independent local suppliers.
 

Tuitui Manager Jade, with owners Salli and Brian Sewell.

 

Brian and Sali’s attention to detail extends to the handpicked wine selection, featuring local vintages, often with interesting stories to tell, like Stoneleigh’s Wild Valley made with grapes that have been wild fermented by naturally-occurring micro-flora. As you would expect, New Zealand vineyards take pride of place on the wine list but there’s still room for a couple of full-bodied Aussie reds. Beer comes from Waipu’s McLeods Brewery, with an exclusive ‘Tuitui IPA’ available on tap.


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