Our incredible new galleries are now open

 

Who are we, as Aucklanders? The stories that begin to answer that question are told in many languages, over many generations, and through many objects. Tāmaki Herenga Waka means "the gathering place of many waka", and this new permanent gallery chronicles Auckland's past, captures its present, and looks to the future.

Take the road less travelled, and have a drink on us
ACTOR-LED TOUR

Take the road less travelled, and have a drink on us

Join us on Twilight Tuesdays in May to venture down the road less travelled with our actor-led ‘Detours’. Uncover the glossed-over, swept-under-the-carpet stories of the people and places that have shaped our Auckland. Finish your night with a cocktail or glass of bubbles on us at Tuitui Museum Café & Bistro.

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Discover Auckland all over again
 

Who are we?

Ko wai tātou?

Who are we?

Tāmaki Herenga Waka: Stories of Auckland encourages you to look at your city through new eyes.

The journey begins with the three iwi that make up the Museum's Taumata-ā-Iwi: Ngāti Whātua, Ngāti Paoa and Waikato-Tainui. They are represented by three illuminated manu (birds) by artist Mike Crawford. Each iwi curated its own display with a selection of taonga in response to the question "Ko wai tātou? Who are we?"

Auckland

Tāmaki

Auckland

Auckland looked very different for the first families who settled here, and this section of the gallery looks at why people have made this place their home for centuries. Explore the development of Tāmaki through the eyes of the Māori, colonial and Pasifika families who settled here.

Land

Whenua

Land

From Ihumātao to Karangahape Road to Maungakiekie One Tree Hill, this mix of historic and contemporary stories explores how people draw strength and identity from the unique landscape of Tāmaki.

Water

Wai

Water

With its three harbours – Kaipara, Manukau and Waitematā – Tāmaki's nearly two thousand kilometres of coastline not only shapes the geography of the region, it defines how we live. Try your hand at hauling a waka overland, travel back in time with a hand-built Victorian-style diorama, or explore the history of the Chelsea Sugar Factory.

Our City

Taku Tāone

Our City

Whether it's a drag club, a music venue, a football club or a park, there are places you'll know like the back of your hand, and others you never knew existed. Short films and diverse objects illustrate the experiences of different communities living in Auckland.

Activate!

Maranga!

Activate!

Auckland is the most urbanised place in Aotearoa which comes with a range of pressures, culture clashes, and challenges, as well as great opportunities. As well as stories of activism and protest, there are also stories of conservation, revitalisation and of innovation and entrepreneurship.

Living City

Rarau Mai

Living City

Millions of pieces of data have been crunched to create Living City, an immersive gallery of stunning data visualisations where the walls and floor are alive with projections illustrating who we are as Aucklanders and the places we inhabit. Use the interactive touchscreen to dive further into a specific location such as your own neighbourhood.

Expand your experience
 

Their stories, your own speed
AUDIO GUIDE

Their stories, your own speed

There's a lot more to the stories in Tāmaki Herenga Waka than will fit on a display label. Available in te reo Māori, English and Chinese Mandarin, this self-guided audio tour is launched from your own smartphone. Remember to bring your headphones!

Launch audio guide

Can you make all the birds sing?

Can you make all the birds sing?

Tāmaki Herenga Waka: Stories of Auckland is packed with interactive displays and activities, from a Victorian-style diorama of the Auckland Regatta to a haul-a-waka challenge, to an opportunity to recreate the famous Tiritiri Matangi dawn chorus.

Get hands-on

Out of the box


From club mix tracks to surveys on data surveillance, some of the objects in Tāmaki Herenga Waka have lives outside of their display cases. Dig deeper into some of those stories here.

 

Fashion activists, mana wahine, Aotearoa rebels!

Pacific Sisters

Fashion activists, mana wahine, Aotearoa rebels!

The Pacific Sisters collective, established in Auckland in 1992, asserts an urban transcultural identity using ceremony, art, adornment and performance. Three aitu/avatars by the collective form part of the Tāmaki Herenga Waka collection.

Take a closer look

Eyes on Tāmaki

Mata ki te Mata

Eyes on Tāmaki

Eyes on Tamaki is an interactive experience inside Living city exploring the ins and outs of data surveillance and facial recognition technology. Discover what data is collected on your smartphone, and what’s happening behind all those fun face filters.

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